Volunteer Spotlight:
Amba Stapert

The 1st Reef Ranger


Overview

Amba approched us after learning about our coral lab project in Lombok with other TU Delft students. Because she showed great interest and self-motivation, and because her skillsets complimented the project well, Reef Support and IBF decided that Amba would become the "first reef ranger", where she would travel to Lombok for 2 months to develop a standard for data collection and reef monitoring, the reef ranger program for future volunteers, take part in restoration dives, and of course, to take care of the precious corals.


Self-Biography

"My name is Amba Stapert, a student from The Netherlands, born in Amsterdam at April 12th 2000. Three weeks ago I finished the bachelor Life Science & Technology at the Delft University of Technology. During my bachelor, the complexity and precision of survival mechanisms of living organisms, ranging from bacteria to human beings, have really caught my interest. Another big part of my life has been scuba diving. From the moment I laid my eyes on beautiful sea life in Egypt I got addicted. When I was ten years old I did my first dive and soon after I completed my PADI open water course.

The past years have shown coral reefs have more difficulties to survive and are decreasing in size rapidly, which got me worried. Finding out Reef Support and Indonesia Biru Foundation (IBF) started a collaboration and built a coral lab in Indonesia to restore reefs, do research and educate local communities, immediately got my interest and I got on an airplane two days after finishing my bachelor to paradise island, Lombok to help them with the different projects."


Beaches & Coastlines

Each year, billions of pounds of trash and other pollutants enter the ocean. Some of the debris ends up on our beaches, washed in with the waves and tides. Waste then sink, eaten by animals that mistake it for food or accumulate in ocean gyres. Despite the economic benefits of tourism, beach managers have grown increasingly resistant to continued resort development due to lack of clear predictive insights and planning strategies. We brings informative insights to better manage coastal and land-based pollution for healthier beaches and coastlines.

Letter B with palm tree

Coral Lab

Coral reefs are exceptionally valuable; they provide food, livelihoods and economic opportunity to more than half a billion people in over 100 countries; they are also teeming with life, hosting a quarter of all known marine species. Nearly 200 million people depend on coral reefs to protect them from storm surges and waves. Increased acidification, pollution, fishing and other forms of coastal activities all impact our fuure of our coral reefs.

SEE PAGE
Letter B with palm tree

Beaches & Coastlines

Each year, billions of pounds of trash and other pollutants enter the ocean. Some of the debris ends up on our beaches, washed in with the waves and tides. Waste then sink, eaten by animals that mistake it for food or accumulate in ocean gyres. Despite the economic benefits of tourism, beach managers have grown increasingly resistant to continued resort development due to lack of clear predictive insights and planning strategies. We brings informative insights to better manage coastal and land-based pollution for healthier beaches and coastlines.

Letter B with palm tree

Latest Post

April 7 2022

One week after arriving, one of the IBF team members guided me through the amazing area and cities surrounding the coral lab in Kecinan Bay and one of the Gili islands, Gili Trawangan.

This first week I had time to get to know the always welcoming Indonesian people, have some delicioys Nasi Goreng, enjoy the tropical sun and getting around the island on a motorcycle and of course, seeing the high diversity of life underwater. Speaking a combination of English words and some Bahasa Indonesia I got to know the wonderful local people at Kecinan Bay. They are always joyful, laughing and ready to help me with everything and especially, show me the relaxing life between palm trees drinking fresh coconut water with amazing sea views.

During my second week I finished the PADI Advanced and Rescue course at Gili Trawangan to gain more diving knowledge and experience at different conditions with a team of three great instructors and my diving buddy. We saw turtles, sharks, stingrays and many other fish and corals.

After becoming a more experienced diver, I went back to Kecinan Bay to continue with the projects of the coral lab. One of the founders of IBF, André Saputra, learned me how to carry out reef surveys identifying fish, invertebrates and substrates, how to compose a photomosaic of coral reefs and to sketch an eco habitat of the shore, based on images obtained during snorkling or using a drone. Next weeks, I will be busy with maintenance of the reef tanks and coral restoration site, improving my skills and collecting data with the different methods.

SEE MORE

Coral Lab

Coral reefs are exceptionally valuable; they provide food, livelihoods and economic opportunity to more than half a billion people in over 100 countries; they are also teeming with life, hosting a quarter of all known marine species. Nearly 200 million people depend on coral reefs to protect them from storm surges and waves. Increased acidification, pollution, fishing and other forms of coastal activities all impact our fuure of our coral reefs.

SEE PAGE
Letter B with palm tree

Become a Reef Ranger Today


Beaches & Coastlines

Each year, billions of pounds of trash and other pollutants enter the ocean. Some of the debris ends up on our beaches, washed in with the waves and tides. Waste then sink, eaten by animals that mistake it for food or accumulate in ocean gyres. Despite the economic benefits of tourism, beach managers have grown increasingly resistant to continued resort development due to lack of clear predictive insights and planning strategies. We brings informative insights to better manage coastal and land-based pollution for healthier beaches and coastlines.

Letter B with palm tree

Why Volunteer?

Do you have an yearning to interact with our oceans on a deeper level? Travel and dive with us to experience coral reefs and marine biodiversity in a way that is adventurous, personal and impactful.

As a Reef ranger, you get involved to help protect some of the most precious living species today and work closely with local organizations and get creative to solve different problems. Engaged volunteers help to monitor our reefs, organize local programs, but always have a global outlook, that is how we continue to educate and spread awareness.

Go to Reef Ranger page

Coral Lab

Coral reefs are exceptionally valuable; they provide food, livelihoods and economic opportunity to more than half a billion people in over 100 countries; they are also teeming with life, hosting a quarter of all known marine species. Nearly 200 million people depend on coral reefs to protect them from storm surges and waves. Increased acidification, pollution, fishing and other forms of coastal activities all impact our fuure of our coral reefs.

SEE PAGE
Letter B with palm tree

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